Category Archives: Swedish Film

Infographic: The Demographics of Ingmar Bergman

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I recently discovered a really cool feature on IMDb. Click on any film and you can see the film’s average rating (1 to 10) amongst site visitors who have voted on that particular film. It also shows how many people have voted to make up that individual film’s rating. The really cool feature happens when you click on the total number of voters. It takes you to a demographics page, illustrating how men and women of various ages have voted for that particular film. The possibilities with something like this are limitless, and I can’t wait to dig into it a little bit more. But for now, there’s no better place to start than with everyone’s favorite master of melancholy, Ingmar Bergman. Here’s how the various demographics have voted for Ingmar Bergman films. Continue reading

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Filed under Ingmar Bergman, Movies, Swedish Film

11 Great Parodies of Ingmar Bergman

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When you have a career that spans seven decades, and you’re talented enough to forge some of the best work in your field, it’s inevitable that people will stand up and take notice. Such is the case with Ingmar Bergman, whose films are almost synonymous with art house cinema. Thankfully for us, that means that Bergman’s work has been parodied time and time again. Here are eleven great parodies of Ingmar Bergman’s films. Continue reading

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Filed under Humor, Ingmar Bergman, Movies, Swedish Film

Re-Watchterpiece Theater: The Seventh Seal (1957)

Re-Watchterpiece Theater is a series that explores the organic way that attitudes about films change after you watch them a second time, a third time, or more, further down the line than the original viewing.

Re-watchterpiece Theater is usually a vehicle for me to tackle questionable films, or films that are likely to elicit a much different response at this point in my life compared to the first time I watched it. And that’s what makes today’s choice so odd. The Seventh Seal has been one of my favorite films from the moment I saw it. It hasn’t even been that long ago that I last saw it. But sometimes, you find yourself in a Bergmany mood and sometimes, in that Bergmany mood, you find that you’ve learned some new tricks. Continue reading

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Filed under Foreign Film, Ingmar Bergman, Movies, Re-Watchterpiece Theater, Swedish Film

Polish Film Posters for Ingmar Bergman Films

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Whatever’s in the water in Poland, I’d like to drink it. Because Polish movie poster artists have quite a knack for spinning film art into something completely unique. It’s as evident anywhere as it is with posters for the films of Ingmar Bergman, whose work was ripe for artistic interpretation and visual license. The beauty of these posters is that they’re intriguing even if you’re unfamiliar with Bergman or Polish art. And they’re a visual treat if you’re familiar with either. Here are ten Polish movie posters for Ingmar Bergman films. Continue reading

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Filed under Movies, Swedish Film

Explaining Earth to Extraterrestrials Using Five Films

Wunderkind film writer Sam Fragoso from Duke & the Movies has cooked up a doozie of a blogathon this week. This is the task at hand:

Extraterrestrial forces land on Earth. Unknowing of our planet and society, you can pick five films from the history of cinema that represent humanity. What titles would you choose and why?

It’s a really unique concept. At its heart, the blogathon is about boiling down all of humanity and civilized history into five films. As a human, I feel that I’m uniquely qualified to select five films of my own, each for specific reasons. Continue reading

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Filed under Foreign Film, French Film, Ingmar Bergman, Movies, Spanish Movies, Swedish Film

Remembering Erland Josephson: A Career in Screen Stills

For years, Woody Allen has used “surrogates”. They’re characters who are the on-screen representation of Woody Allen. Many directors do the same thing. For instance, Ingmar Bergman did it often, and he almost always used a member of his troupe of actors. Over the weekend, one of Bergman’s surrogates, Erland Josephson, passed away. He was 89 years old. He and Bergman collaborated on more than 40 films and plays. As a fan of Bergman, I am a fan of Josephson by proxy. To honor his career, here are a series of screen caps of Josephson in Bergman films. Continue reading

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Filed under Foreign Film, Ingmar Bergman, Movies, Swedish Film

Expanding Upon TCM’s List: Ten More Influential Silent Films

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) has provided a wealth of classic movies for cinephiles to watch, commercial-free, since April 1994. They’re a tremendous resource, offering films 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Part of what makes them so lovable is their dedication to silent cinema. They have a weekly feature called “Silent Sundays” during which they air several hours of silent films beginning at midnight. It’s no surprise that the recent success of The Artist, a modern-day silent film, would grab TCM’s eye. To celebrate the film a few weeks ago, they released their own list of the 10 Most Influential Silent Films. It was an impressive list, and can be found here. I think it’s a tremendous starting place for movie-watchers interested in silent cinema. Having said that, I think it could easily be expanded to include ten more films. Here are ten that I think could be added: Continue reading

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Filed under Foreign Film, German Films, Movies, Silent Movies, Swedish Film