Infographic: The Body Count in The Godfather

Seeing The Godfather (1972) in the theatre was the highlight of my movie-watching weekend. It was like seeing every single memorable, quotable scene with a new set of eyes. One inescapable aspect: there are a LOT of people who die in The Godfather. Obviously, the most die in one particular scene, but that scene isn’t the only culprit. There are characters dying at a steady pace throughout. Let this infographic show you just how many characters died, and how they died:
Clearly, spoilers follow.

If you’re going to do this the right way, I strongly recommend clicking play on this video to properly establish the mood:

Note: This infographic represents only the first film in the Godfather trilogy. Please click to enlarge.


39 Comments

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39 responses to “Infographic: The Body Count in The Godfather

  1. Whenever I pop in and see a post with the title INFOGRAPHIC I get excited!! HAHA You are the master at them!

    Brilliant

  2. Wow. Just fantastic. I love it. You should do one for the other Godfather films.

  3. haha! for some reason i find this funny… funny and clever. hello, john… 🙂

  4. Once again, you’ve outdone yourself with the infographic.

  5. Chaqudemus

    moe greene and vito look great

  6. Nice! I like the keys.
    It reminds me that I have only seen this film once and it was back when I was doing my minor in American History at the University. Instead of studying for the final exam I thought I would pop in the DVD and relax to get to the “studying”. But I ended watching the entire triology the whole night… If movies get in the way of your studies. Give up school!

  7. Great stuff John!

    Regarding the garrote wire, when I was a teenager, I worked at a butcher shop around the corner from my house in South Philly. The butcher’s name is Marty (He is still alive, but the shop is gone. We talk occasionally. We also share a birthday.), and he was affectionately called Marty the Butcher, a name with all kinds of mafia connotations. Keep in mind that I worked there during the height of the South Philly mafia wars during the early 80s (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philadelphia_crime_family). Anyway… he had a garrote hanging on one of the many meat hooks that lined the back wall of the shop. He would use it to cut wheels of hard cheese (Pecorino Romano and Sharp Provolone usually) into large chucks for reselling to his customers. That thing worked like a charm. Everyone was nice to Marty.

    One last thing regarding the mob wars…

    On March 21, 1980, the Gentle Don, Angelo Bruno, was murdered outside of his home on Snyder Avenue in South Philly. This was the same night that the famous “Who Shot JR?” episode of Dallas aired on CBS. Weird right?

    • Marty the Butcher is an aaaaaawesome name. I’ve heard a little bit about the Philly mafia thing on some of those shows on… I think it’s the Bio network? I think it’s fascinating that so many cities around America have their own organized crime stories. Everyone knows NYC, Chicago, and Vegas. But there’s also Boston, Philly, St. Louis, Kansas City, Cleveland… I’m sure there are more. Those are the five that I know about for sure. Detroit HAS to have a mob history.

      I’d be leery of eating cheese that was sliced by a garrote wire owned by a guy named Marty the Butcher.

      • Heh. I will assure you that Marty never used that wire on anything other than cheese. He’s a super nice guy.

        Then again… he kinda looks like Uncle Junior (Johnny Ola in GF II) on The Sopranos, so I guess we’ll never know if that garrote was used inappropriately.

        • It’s funny you mention the Sopranos/Godfather link (and of course, the billions of links between Sopranos and Goodfellas). I swear I saw Carmine Lupertazzi in The Godfather this time. He didn’t even have a speaking role. And IMDb verifies it. He was a wedding guest. It was just for half a second. But that guy’s fish lips are pretty unmistakeable.

  8. The guy who met Kevin Meany

    Nice work! That should be a poster in a college dorm room. You could make money on this one.

  9. Nicely done. Do you plan on doing infographics for the rest of the trilogy?

    • Yep. I’m not sure when- probably very soon. I’d like to rewatch the other two just to be sure I’m not forgetting anyone.

  10. New to your site, and I have no idea how it took me so long to find it. I’ve been browsing your old posts for an hour and they’re all fantastic. LOVE this infographic. I rewatched The Godfather this weekend too, so this is just perfect timing. Really amusing and well done.

    Love your site.

    • Thanks, Alex! It’s very much appreciated and I’m glad you’re digging the site.

      I bet I’ve seen The Godfather in bits and pieces 30 times. But I don’t often sit down and watch the whole thing, start to finish. Doing it in a theatre was probably the best theatre experience I’ve ever had.

  11. Ahaha love these infographics and the little quirky details you add here and there. Keep them coming John 😀

  12. Sam Fragoso

    This is why I love coming here everyday John. The infographic is quite inventive.

  13. What an awesome infographic!! Too bad IMDb hit list is gone as this should’ve been on it. You da bomb, John!

    • Ha, thanks, Ruth!

      Speaking of IMDb, have you seen if they’ve been sharing anything on Twitter and Facebook? I haven’t noticed anything.

  14. Well done, another masterful job!

  15. Pingback: Infographic: The Body Count in The Godfather: Part II |

  16. Pingback: CinemaCap ( Apr 26 – May 9 ) : A Collection of Great Reviews and Posts | Taste of Cinema

  17. manilovefilmsdylan

    Inspired work, John. So…assuming you got paid for this, given the ad for the video game at the bottom? If so, well done!

  18. Pingback: Infographic: The Body Count in The Godfather: Part III |

  19. Ian

    What about the other two men Al Neri killed along with Barzini? His chauffeur and the guy next to him? One was shot twice and the other once, and they looked pretty dead to me, even if Michael didn’t mention them to Carlo.

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