The March Movie Calendar (and Other Work)

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It’s the first week of the month. And that means it’s time for the monthly movie calendar that I design for Movies.com, featuring the month’s wide release films (and some limited release films), movies coming to blu-ray, and a smorgasbord of March video on demand choices provided to me by Peter Hall. Additionally, I’ve designed a few other pieces in the last month or so that I’d like to share. Continue reading


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Re-Watchterpiece Theater: Magnolia

Re-Watchterpiece Theater is a series that explores the organic way that attitudes about films change after you watch them a second time, a third time, or more, further down the line than the original viewing.

Today’s Re-Watchterpiece Theater episode has been in the works for a long time, although it took an unfortunate event to make it happen. I’ve been meaning to re-watch Magnolia for at least a year now. My attitude about P.T. Anderson has changed so much in that time. And it took the tragic death of Philip Seymour Hoffman to serve as the spark. Continue reading

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The Movie Weekend That Was

MovieWeekend

This weekend was a great one for themes. There were two films from 1999 in the mix, three Japanese Criterion films, two ghost movies (technically, one of those two had a lot more than just ghosts), and two films that dug deep into the psyche of the business of sports. For good measure, Elijah Wood made an appearance in a gimmicky Hitchcockian thriller involving a piano. This is the movie weekend that was. Continue reading

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Infographic: The Evolution of Offense in Baseball

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Bart Giamatti* once said, “[Baseball] breaks your heart. It is designed to break your heart. The game begins in the spring, when everything else begins again, and it blossoms in the summer, filling the afternoons and evenings, and then as soon as the chill rains come, it stops and leaves you to face the fall all alone. You count on it, rely on it to buffer the passage of time, to keep the memory of sunshine and high skies alive, and then just when the days are all twilight, when you need it most, it stops.” It was at that point, when the chill rains came in early November, that I first started playing around with today’s infographic. Little did I know that it would take me more than three months to complete. The sheer fact that I kept working on it that long speaks volumes for the charm of Giamatti’s game. But now, with baseball beginning again just like everything else, I’ve finally completed it. What I’ve done is put together an infographic featuring the way offense in baseball has evolved since the dawn of the 20th century. The way teams score runs, and take their at-bats, has changed dramatically over the course of 114 years, and I’ve tried to find a way to visualize it. Enjoy! Continue reading

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My Proposal for Saving the Walking Dead

WalkingDead

I don’t really watch The Walking Dead so much as I hate-watch it these days. I realize that I’m part of the problem. But I have also come up with a solution. I know exactly how to save the show. Here’s my plan, in screenplay form, for how to bring the show to a conclusion. Continue reading

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The Movie Weekend That Was

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Fighting a cold and watching movies can make for a perfect pairing. That was the case this weekend, as I bunkered down under some blankets with cold meds and a boatload of movies. Featured this weekend: two critical darlings of the last five years, a David Lynch oddity (even by David Lynch standards), a healthy dose of urban legend horror, some samurai, and a trippy British indie thriller. This is the movie weekend that was. Continue reading

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The Academia Nut Series: Kelli Marshall

AcademiaNut

Academia Nut is a new series at tdylf in which I conduct interviews (via the exciting world of email!) with various academics and accomplished writers about film, TV, and pop culture. It’s a chance to learn about movies and TV from some of the best minds in the industry. The introductory interview is with Kelli Marshall. Kelli holds a Ph.D. in the humanities (film studies and Shakespeare) from the University of Texas–Dallas. She has taught at her alma mater as well as the University of North Texas, Texas Christian University, and the University of Toledo. She currently teaches classes on Seinfeld, film and television comedy, and the works of Spike Lee and Quentin Tarantino at DePaul University and Columbia College Chicago. Kelli’s research fields include Shakespeare in popular culture and film musicals with a special nod to Gene Kelly. She is also a staunch advocate for social media in and outside the classroom. You can find her work at MediAcademia or follow her on Twitter at @kellimarshall. Continue reading

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